2020 AGENDA


Tuesday, April 21, 2020

1:30 PM
OPENING MAINSTAGE SESSIONS

SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

SETTING THE STAGE: WHERE TO INVEST
For our fifth anniversary of Brainstorm Health, we began with a driving question: Where should we invest to improve the health of Americans and people around the world? What are the most promising technologies, scientific advances, and business models to wager on now? How do we invest strategically in biology’s last frontier, the brain; and in the everyday realm of our workplaces; and in the unfolding dimensions of A.I.? A preview of an extraordinary two days of provocative inquiry to come.

INVESTING IN THE CURRENCY OF HEALTH CARE: DATA
Health care generates nearly one-third of the world’s stored data, according to the New England Journal of Medicine. This data is an information pot that is growing every year and faster than in any other industry. The challenge—and imperative—is to somehow harness this digital trove into significantly healthier outcomes. How soon will we get there, what’s getting in the way now—and how will our health interactions change when data is the most valuable asset of all?

DON’T WAIT UNTIL IT’S BROKEN: INVESTING IN PREVENTION
Our health care system is designed to fix us when something breaks. Mounting evidence also shows it’s inefficient, far too expensive, and, when it breaks down, even deadly. If, as the CDC states, 90% of U.S. health care costs are for often-preventable chronic diseases and mental health conditions, can this really be the right way to go? Amgen CEO Bob Bradway on what it will take to redesign our health care system so that prediction and prevention take the lead.

INVESTING IN PERSONALIZED HEALTH
Over the past decade, health data has moved from thick paper files to electronic health records. That was the first transformation. Now comes a bigger one: migrating from EHRs to health care consumers themselves. Armed with smart devices and knowledge of their personal genomic profiles, individuals are increasingly making their own more-informed health care decisions. Welcome to the revolution. Oh—and one question: Is the revolution real?

INVESTING IN COMMUNITIES
In downtown Chicago, a person born today can expect to live to age 83. Three train stops away, in Washington Park, average life expectancy is 69. In the area around Dallas, average lifespans can vary by 18 years, depending on the zip code. How do we make health care smarter and more affordable across the board when there is no “across the board”? The CEOs of Fortune 500 giants Centene and Baxter International share how some new thinking—and new tech—can deliver better, cheaper care to more front doors.

MOVING BEYOND STIGMA: INVESTING IN MENTAL WELL-BEING
Mental illness impacts one in five Americans and costs employers more than $200 billion a year, with everything from sick days to poor performance at work adding to the soaring cost. A probing conversation with Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins, who is championing a bold new approach to well-being for his 75,000-person workforce, and National Institute of Mental Health director Dr. Joshua Gordon.

INVESTING IN OUR BRAINS
How can we strengthen the most complex organ in our body and help our brains function at optimal performance at any age? What’s the real connection between aging and cognitive decline—and can we overcome it? Neurosurgeon and globe-trotting CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta shares some keen insights from his new book, Keep Sharp.

90,000 HOURS: INVESTING IN THE WORKPLACE
That’s the amount of time the average person spends at work over a lifetime. And yet, it’s the time that we’re least likely to think about our well-being. As we transform health care, many are looking to the workplace as the most critical laboratory. When it comes to our health, what works at work?

FROM CORONAVIRUS TO PANDEMIC FLU: INVESTING TO PREVENT THE “BIG ONE”
The coronavirus outbreak that began in Wuhan, China, in November is one of the biggest challenges the collective world has faced in years—not just in terms of the human toll, but also as a test of health care infrastructure everywhere and the resiliency of global trade. We still don’t know how soon we’ll be fully out of this crisis. What better time is there to start preparing for the next one?

STARTING FROM SCRATCH: INVESTING IN THE NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE
In 2000, Rwanda had one of the highest rates of mortality for children under five in sub-Saharan Africa. Today it has one of the lowest. How leaders built one of the most resilient and effective health care systems on the African continent in record time.

INVESTING IN THE UNKNOWN
The Human Genome Project began in 1990. Thirteen years (and $2.7 billion in U.S. funding) later, a final sequence of human DNA was announced. Even then, in 2003, few would have predicted how commonplace, cheap, and integral to medicine genomic sequencing would become a generation later. And yet the unknown—and unfathomable—is precisely what we must invest in if we are to change the course of human health and longevity. How will the risks we take today reshape the future of medicine? Let the exploration begin.

6:30 PM
RECEPTION
7:00 PM
DINNER WITH FEATURED SPEAKER

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

7:30 AM
CONCURRENT BREAKFAST DISCUSSIONS

SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

INVESTING IN INNOVATION
In 2019, investors poured nearly $7.5 billion into hundreds of digital health enterprises. Which areas of health care are poised to deliver the best gains in a startup landscape that seems to be changing by the day? A roundtable discussion on the investing outlook for 2020 and beyond.

Additional sessions will be announced.

9:00 AM
MORNING MAINSTAGE SESSIONS

SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

INVESTING IN REINVENTION
Medicare actuaries predict national health spending to increase 5.5% a year through 2027, far outpacing the growth in GDP. If government can’t seem to break this trend, can private companies manage the task? Indeed, from new corporate alliances to value-based payment and care models to a host of new tech—Quiz: Can 5G lower your health bill?—many companies are placing big bets now on prevention, efficiency, and personalization, in the hope of lowering costs. Here’s where the smart money is headed.

THE ECON CURE: HOW TO REFINANCE THE HEALTH REVOLUTION

The hunt for new and sophisticated financial models is on as we try to figure out how to pay for health in the 21st century. From funding the development of urgently needed antibiotics and vaccines to building the health care infrastructure of tomorrow, we’ll need some bold, new approaches. One of the world’s leading economists has some thoughts on that. Who’d have thunk it?

KEYNOTE INTERVIEW: SEAN PARKER, SOCIAL INVESTOR
Sean Parker has anticipated more social business revolutions than anyone on the planet. He saw the disruptive power of Facebook and of music sharing early on. And now, with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, he has pioneered a radically innovative approach to fostering collaborations in cancer research. Our tag team of Arianna Huffington and MIT economist Andrew Lo put Parker through the paces on everything from empowerment zones to the age of smartphone medicine to what’s coming next.

FASTER, SMARTER RESEARCH—INVESTING IN DRUG DEVELOPMENT
The cost of bringing a new medicine to market—one well-cited study puts the price tag at $2.6 billion—is unsustainable. For patients in need, the time it takes for that same drug to gain approval—a decade or longer—is unforgivable. We need ways to get there smarter, faster, cheaper. As it turns out, there are plenty of them. An orthodoxy-busting discussion.

MEDICARE GOES MODERN: A ONE-ON-ONE WITH CMS ADMINISTRATOR SEEMA VERMA
Seema Verma has more day-to-day authority over America’s health spending than anybody else. The CMS administrator oversees programs that provide health care to more than 130 million Americans and account for one-third of the federal budget. But you may be surprised about some of the ways she thinks Medicare and Medicaid can be transformed. (Hint: big data plays a big role.) And yes, she has some not-so-modest ideas about ways that the private sector can accelerate the digital health revolution, too. A candid conversation with Medicare’s boss.

INVESTING NEXT DOOR
Low socioeconomic status can be more detrimental to a person’s health than high blood pressure, obesity, and alcohol over-consumption combined. It’s one of the strongest predictors of illness and early death worldwide, yet it’s often overlooked in health care policymaking. From creating safer homes, schools, and work environments to making healthier food and exercise more accessible, here’s how to ensure that good health isn’t just a perk for society’s top.

THE C-SUITE TAKES ON GUN VIOLENCE: INVESTING IN SAFE STREETS
This past summer, after mass shootings claimed 68 lives in a single month, 145 of America’s top CEOs wrote the U.S. Senate to demand new legislation to prevent gun violence. Today, more and more corporate leaders argue that reducing gun violence is as fundamental to creating a healthy America as any other policy. Chip Bergh, the CEO of Levi Strauss & Co., tells us why so many of his fellow chief executives are now saying, “Enough is enough.”

ONE TINY HABIT AT A TIME—INVESTING IN BEHAVIOR CHANGE
Whether it’s eating or sleeping less or exercising more, changing and creating habits can seem easy at first, but sooner or later they fall by the wayside. So what’s the trick? A look into the science behind making life changes and guaranteeing your resolutions will become truly resolute.

HOSPITAL, HEAL THYSELF: INVESTING IN NEW PARADIGMS
Visit hospitals around the country and you’ll see the same, age-old ills: patient delays, nurse and doctor shortages, acquired infections, exorbitant costs, insurmountable debt. But if we can’t seem to heal hospitals, perhaps we can reinvent them. Some say the best way to start is to move much of “hospital care” out of legacy buildings and into the digital age—but will that work? For an insiders’ take on one of the biggest transformations in health care, stay tuned.

1:00 PM
CONCURRENT LUNCH DISCUSSIONS

DATA, PRIVACY, SECURITY: INVESTING IN TRUST
More than 41 million Americans were affected by health care data breaches last year—triple the number of people affected by such breaches in 2018. And consumer concerns regarding both security and privacy are only growing as our medical devices and apps become even more connected. It’s no small matter: How can an industry insatiable for data ensure it doesn’t eat the consumers that feed it?

INVESTING IN THE CONSUMER: PUTTING PATIENTS IN “THE WHITE COAT”
From personalized shopping to on-demand entertainment, many industries are finding successful ways to put customers first. Health care isn’t one of those industries. That may simply be because the current business model puts everyone other than the consumer (insurers, employers, providers, PBMs) in charge. Can technology put patients in command–or do we need to rethink the business of health care itself? A $3.65 trillion question.

INVESTING IN TECHNOLOGY
An alphanumeric soup of buzzy tech, from A.I. to 5G, is transforming health care in ways small and big—some of it expected, much of it not. What new advances should we expect across the health care spectrum, from drug development to diagnosis? How can businesses capitalize on the innovation? Our med school primer on everything from blockchain to quantum computing

2:45 PM
AFTERNOON MAINSTAGE SESSIONS

SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE

INVESTING IN FEEDING THE PLANET
According to the United Nations’ World Food Program, one in nine people on earth do not have enough to eat. This is a crisis that Ertharin Cousin, the former head of WFP, is determined to solve—not by increasing the quantity of food, but rather the quality. Her surprising claim? We can ensure everyone has access to nutritious food by redirecting resources and being smarter with the tech we have already. Ambassador Cousin reveals her audacious plan to end world hunger now.

GUT DECISIONS: INVESTING IN THE FUTURE OF FOOD
Personalized nutrition is the item du jour on the food industry’s menu. Pushed by everything from dietary imperatives to environmental and ethical ones, what we’re eating is changing—or is about to. From plant-based burgers that taste like beef to nutritiously enhanced produce, two titans of food tech weigh in on the big changes ahead for our stomachs, and our planet.

CHANGING MINDS: INVESTING IN BRAIN SCIENCE
With 44 million people worldwide living with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, the need to invest in the health of our brains has never been greater. After a slew of high-profile drug failures in clinical trials, is there anything promising left on the horizon? And can a change in lifestyle stop the disease from progressing? Why there’s more hope than meets the eye.

INVESTING IN DIGITAL HEALTH
Five years ago, when we launched Fortune Brainstorm Health, industry prophets, entrepreneurs, and yes, a prognosticator or two at Fortune predicted the digital health revolution was just around the corner. The corner has moved, it would seem. And yet, thanks to advances in cloud computing, mobile technology—and soon, telecom networks that can support a deluge of data—the health sector seems (again) on the brink of enormous change. Were the prophets wrong–or just early? A candid assessment.

OFF THE COURT: THE NBA INVESTS IN MENTAL HEALTH
After recent disclosures by pro athletes about their mental health struggles, from OCD to anxiety and depression, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver is making mental health care a top priority in his league. Expansive new guidelines and mandated hiring of full-time mental health professionals are just some of the rules enacted under his watch. A courtside conversation about turning a taboo topic in the locker room into a lifeline for millions on the sidelines.

Additional sessions to be announced

5:00 PM
ADJOURN